Hearing Aids

Digital hearing aids digitally programmable aids, convert sound waves into digital signals and produce an exact duplication of sound. Computer chips in digital hearing aids analyze speech and other environmental sounds. The digital hearing aids allow for more complex processing of sound during the amplification process which improve their performance in all environments.  Most individuals who seek hearing help are offered a choice of only digital technology these days.

The digital revolution has made a huge impact on the way hearing aids look, feel and work. They can be so small that they are virtually invisible, so “cool” looking that you will want everyone to see them. And so natural sounding, they mimic the way you used to hear before you experienced hearing loss.

Digital Hearing Aid Features:

  • Dual microphones allow you to hear better in noisy situations. Some can even identify the source of the noise and reduce it.
  • Open technology that keeps the ear canal unobstructed eliminates that “talking in a barrel” effect.
  • Feedback cancellation does just that… It cancels feedback BEFORE you hear it as an annoying whistle.
  • Hands free technology automatically adjusts to your listening environment… whether you are on the phone, in a crowd or in wind.
  • Your digital hearing aid can be programmed with a computer to meet your individualized needs.
  • Wireless technology allows you to hear your cell phone, television and home phone in stereo, directly through your hearing aids.

Communication Tips:

  • Face the person who has a hearing loss so that he or she can see your face when you speak.
  • Be sure that lighting is in front of you when you speak. This allows a person with a hearing impairment to observe facial expressions, gestures, and lip and body movements that provide communication clues.
  • During conversations, turn off the radio or television.
  • Avoid speaking while chewing food or covering your mouth with your hands.
  • Speak slightly louder than normal, but don’t shout. Shouting may distort your speech.
  • Speak at your normal rate, and do not exaggerate sounds.
  • Clue the person with the hearing loss about the topic of the conversation whenever possible.
  • Rephrase your statement into shorter, simpler sentences if it appears you are not being understood.
  • In restaurants and social gatherings, choose seats or conversation areas away from crowded or noisy areas.

GN Resound